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On Radical Traditionalism

When deciding whether an expressed desire for authentic and traditional Catholic teaching and praxis, and vigilance toward the same, is radical, we must look deeper and not stay on the surface.

When Bishops fail to safeguard Catholic teaching - because many times they fail - we must feel the pain of that failure and accompany those who have been failed in their right desires and denied their patrimony, not condemn them. It is not enough just to condemn over-reactions or hyper-vigilance, we must show them love. We must admit that we, the Church, have often failed them. We have repeatedly failed in granting them their rights and failed to be generous in so many ways.

So much depends on how the texts of The Second Vatican Council are interpreted. The question is not that of changing doctrine, but to go into the depths, and ensuring that pastoral efforts take into account people’s situations, and that, which it is possible for people to do and believe.

This is the long path that the Church must travel. The faith is in a very "serious crisis" in that so many people don't receive the authentic faith anymore. We need to give an answer and that answer cannot be "get over it" or "get out." But we need to think deeply about it. One must avoid to stay on the surface.

As long as the real problems of these poor souls are not radically resolved by rejecting creeping modernism and a genuine embrace of that which has been held sacred and can never be viewed as hamrful, no solution will be found for these problems.

*subhead*Love.*subhead*

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8 comments:

Amy Giglio said...

This might be the best thing you've written about this subject ever. I can't use strong enough terms to describe how much I agree with you. All sides of every issue in the Church must approach each other with love. That means for those who have been put down must always reach their hands back out in love, even when they are slapped or put in chains. This is the way of the saints. Love and truth always prevail. Sometimes it takes a long time, but love and truth always win.

Jay McNally said...

Good post.

Patrick Archbold said...

A previous comment was deleted, but not for anything objectionable. The author can contact me for the reason. I apologize.

C'estMoi said...

Good one, Pat. Oh, how I wish he would say that or words to that effect. I'm not holding my breath waiting for that to happen, though. As a tradition-minded Catholic, I feel utterly marginalized by the Church, at every level from the local parish to the diocese and now, even beyond. Your post won't do us any good Pat, but nice work nonetheless.

wkndbeachcomber said...

SMH. When you put it like this, the pain just becomes so much worse... stay strong everyone. Saints are made in good times, but especially in bad times. Remain in the barque and pray hard.

David Madeley said...

"The question is not that of changing doctrine, but to go into the depths, and ensuring that pastoral efforts take into account people’s situations, and that, which it is possible for people to do and believe."

Right. Do and believe. You can't separate the two. The liturgical reform had a strong ecumenical component, so resisting it raises questions about one's commitment to ecumenism. We need to see some clarity about what is acceptable, in belief as well as practise. That would be helpful not just to traditional catholics, but catholics in general.

thetimman said...

Thanks

Salvelinus fontinalis said...

Good stuff. We must pray, but I also believe we have a duty to point out problems and the crisis that is all around us. The Church must become strong again, and with weak kneed bishops ignoring things, it is up to the laity.

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